Posts Tagged ‘museum’

They came, they built, they persevered

Thursday, May 24th, 2012

Time for a long-belated report on the Museum of Chinese in America (MOCA), which I visited in October 2010. The museum, which was created in 1980 but expanded a few years ago at 215 Centre Street in Manhattan’s Chinatown, offers a fresh perspective for those who are used to thinking about 19th- and 20th-century immigration as an Ellis Island–based experience involving Europeans coming to New York.

Among other things, the museum’s permanent exhibition “With a Single Step: Stories in the Making of America” tells how immigrants came to America to earn money for their families in the California Gold Rush and the building of the transcontinental railroad. A poem from the 1840s tells of someone going to America “to fight my family’s hunger. / To make them proud.” As is typically the case with new immigrants, Chinese laborers encountered a fair amount of hatred here, especially when they were hired as strikebreakers in the 1870s.

General store, Museum of Chinese in America

General store, Museum of Chinese in America

The Chinese Exclusion Act of 1882 essentially banned immigration except for merchants, diplomats, and students, and led to the creation of a “bachelor society,” as any laborers who did get into the Land of Liberty, or were already here, were forbidden to bring wives or marry white women. This was particularly cruel for a culture where family is everything. In the meantime, as illustrated by the re-creation of a Chinese general store (above), merchants served as a post office for laborers and a tie to the traditions of their homeland, some of which were maintained in this setting even after they had died out in China. 

The act was finally repealed in 1943, when the war with Japan created a powerful incentive to befriend China. It’s jarring to see a Life magazine page from December 1941 with instructions on “How to Tell Japs from the Chinese”—a public service to keep Chinese people from being attacked by Japanese haters. (Life calls this “a distressing ignorance,” but as far as I could tell, it didn’t protest the assault of Japanese Americans.)

I don’t want to give the impression that the museum is a rebuke to Americans. The Chinese immigrants’ experience was similar, in many ways, to those of the ancestors of most Americans today. The degree of unwelcome was much worse because of the undeniable component of racism. But the sense that I got while touring the museum by myself is that it was created by Americans of Chinese descent who are proud to tell the story of how they came to be part of this country, helping to build it in the process. Becoming an American is still an aspiration, but, significantly, it is not one that requires, or should require, giving up your cultural heritage. We are all enriched by this.

The museum also enlightened me on historical matters of which I was shamefully ignorant: for instance, the Opium Wars. (I had never before seen John Jacob Astor referred to as a “fur and opium millionaire.”) China was a booming exporter in the mid-19th century, interested only in collecting silver in return, and the British Empire became frustrated with the trade imbalance. (This may sound familiar.) The Opium Wars were fought because Britain was trying to force opium into China to create a market for something they could supply. China, not unreasonably, objected.

This is not an immigration issue, but it is illustrative of how much of world history we don’t know about if we don’t seek it out. Seeking it out at MOCA is definitely worth the trip.

Vuelve Museo del Barrio

Friday, October 16th, 2009

El Museo del Barrio celebrates Opening Day of its renovated space on Saturday, Oct. 17, as it kicks off its 40th-anniversary celebrations with an all-day open house. This first part of the renovation includes a new gallery, courtyard, and café.

Exhibits include Voces y Visiones, more than 100 works by Latino, Caribbean, and Latin American artists, and Nexus New York: Latin/American Artists in the Modern Metropolis, which Holland Cotter reviews in today’s Times.

The museum is at 1230 Fifth Ave, at 104th St (right by the Museum of the City of New York).

Welcome, Italian American Museum!

Monday, September 8th, 2008

Vincent Mallozzi reports in the New York Times that the Italian American Museum opens Tuesday in the former Banca Stabile on Mulberry Street, which served Italian immigrants from 1882 to 1932. The museum opened on 44th Street in 2001, but this is obviously a much better location!

Thursday, Sept. 11, is the first day of the San Gennaro Festival in Little Italy, with an outdoor Mass for 9/11 victims.

The cannoli-eating competition is Friday at 1 pm, and the party will go on another week before wrapping up on Sunday, Sept. 21.