Posts Tagged ‘Norwegian’

Transitions in Bay Ridge

Sunday, February 16th, 2014

Tim McLoughlin in the New York Times writes about the Danish Athletic Club on 65th Street in Bay Ridge, Brooklyn. As the Scandinavian population in Bay Ridge dwindles, the club is finding a new clientele among Mexican immigrant families. Manager Reidun Thompson says, “They are like the Norwegians. They work hard, they play hard.”

Brooklyn’s Scandinavian history also lives on in the Scandinavian East Coast Museum. This project, incorporated in 1996 by the dynamo Victoria Hofmo, is still seeking a permanent home, but its website offers histories (written & oral), genealogical information, photos and videos, and a terrific map of old 8th Avenue from 54th to 60th St.

In the meantime they will be celebrating Fastelavn, the Danish Mardi Gras, on Sunday, February 23, and Viking Fest on May 17. Show them some love!

Dance your way through winter

Monday, January 12th, 2009

It’s freezing, and it will be a lot colder on Thursday—which makes it the perfect time for Norwegian folk dancing. Folk Feet on Fifth‘s Norwegian Nights and Levantine Layali begins on Thursday, Jan. 15, with a folk dance class with Paul Busse, the Norwegian Folkdancers Society, and live accordion. Free. The class will be from 7 to 8:30 pm at Salaam Arabic Lutheran Church, 345 Ovington Ave, Brooklyn (R train to Bay Ridge Ave).

The program continues on Jan. 22, with a Lebanese and Palestinian Debke dance class with Ramzi Ed-libi, Jad Lebbos, Sheren Attal and live Arabic percussion, and concludes on Saturday, Jan. 24, with a Norwegian and Levantine Dance Party/Hafla.

Folk Feet on Fifth is part of the Brooklyn Arts Council’s Folk Arts project, and Norwegian Nights and Levantine Layali is presented in partnership with Young Dancers in Repertory.

To register, or for more information, call (347) 702-7155.

Scandinavian East Coast Museum

Tuesday, July 29th, 2008

Sunday’s Times City section has an interview by Jennifer Bleyer with Victoria Hofmo, who grew up in Bay Ridge in a family of Norwegian and Danish descent. She’s been collecting material for the Scandinavian East Coast Museum, which she founded, and now she’s trying to find a home for it in Brooklyn—or perhaps off the coast of Brooklyn. A century ago, there were so many Norwegians in Bay Ridge and lower Sunset Park that, Hofmo says, they called Eighth Avenue Lapskaus Boulevard, after a traditional beef stew.

Although the museum’s home is virtual at the moment, the site includes a forum for Scandinavian genealogical research, a block-by-block map of old Eighth Avenue as well as vintage pictures, a page of history, and a gift shop.

This is just the kind of thing to make an immigration nerd like me jump up and down. I wish Ms. Hofmo all the best and I’ll be sure to report any further developments about the museum.